Depending on the preferences of the parents, I offer skill development, homework help, and test preparation in my hourly sessions. If you are looking for long-term growth, I recommend a more personalized approach.

  1. Plan and Set Goals. After speaking with the student’s parents, teachers, caretakers and evaluating the student’s work, I write granular learning targets based on their level of understanding. The granular targets can range from levels k-12 and are documented, tracked, and shared with everyone on a weekly basis. Having a clear and specific way of communicating with the student’s community avoids breakdown in communication and holds the student accountable for attaining goals.
  2. Identify the Instructional Domain. Depending on which of the 4 Instructional Domains of Mathematics a student may fall into, more time is spent on that particular area. The domains are: Conceptual Knowledge, Procedural Knowledge, Declarative Knowledge, and Problem Solving.
  3. Cultivate Meaning. I tailor skill building lessons according to the student’s interests whether it be art, music, sports, fashion, or gardening in order to cultivate meaning. If a 5th grade student is interested in music, for instance, we use the beats of a song to evaluate the relationship between rational numbers. A 7th grade student who wants to participate in March Madness can predict the winners by weighing stats on espn.com. A recursive formula for an 11th grade student can be determined by looking at the golden ratio of something found in nature.
  4. Demonstration of Knowledge. The student’s level of understanding will be first be checked based on their strengths (i.e.: if they have dyslexia, use visual-spatial reasoning with concrete objects to determine the equation of a line). Then, your child will develop their challenges (i.e.: verbalizing the steps or organizing their work on paper/tablet).
  5. Revise, Revise, Repeat. Finally, the student and I review their learning target and decide on the next steps. The granular learning target is either kept, changed, or modified. The goals must be attainable and realistic according to the student’s needs.